SEVEN AGAINST THEBES

Eteocles and Polynices agree to reign for a year each, alternating the throne. At the end of the first year however, Eteocles refuses to hand the kingdom over to Polynices, who arms six warriors of Argos (seven including him) and sends them to the gates of Thebes to declare war on his brother. Eteocles counters with another seven warriors, including himself, who are to defend the city. A messenger brings news that the seven from Argos have been repelled; only Polynices resists and will have to fight against his own brother Eteocles.

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SEVEN AGAINST THEBES

Eteocles and Polynices agree to reign for a year each, alternating the throne. At the end of the first year however, Eteocles refuses to hand the kingdom over to Polynices, who arms six warriors of Argos (seven including him) and sends them to the gates of Thebes to declare war on his brother. Eteocles counters with another seven warriors, including himself, who are to defend the city. A messenger brings news that the seven from Argos have been repelled; only Polynices resists and will have to fight against his own brother Eteocles.

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THE PHOENICIAN

A group of Phoenician women on their way to the Sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi, arrive in Thebes and witness the events there. The brothers Eteocles and Polynices had agreed to alternate the government of Thebes every year. At the end of his year however, Eteocles has no intention of handing power to his brother, so Polynices appears with an army from Argos to claim his rights. Jocasta summons her two sons to try to come to an agreement but to no avail. Tiresias, the blind seer, states that the only way to save Thebes is to sacrifice the son of Creon, Menoeceus, who accepts his fate and sacrifices himself. Eteocles and Polynices face each other in a duel, and kill each other. Their mother Jocasta kills herself on their dead bodies.

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THE PHOENICIAN

A group of Phoenician women on their way to the Sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi, arrive in Thebes and witness the events there. The brothers Eteocles and Polynices had agreed to alternate the government of Thebes every year. At the end of his year however, Eteocles has no intention of handing power to his brother, so Polynices appears with an army from Argos to claim his rights. Jocasta summons her two sons to try to come to an agreement but to no avail. Tiresias, the blind seer, states that the only way to save Thebes is to sacrifice the son of Creon, Menoeceus, who accepts his fate and sacrifices himself. Eteocles and Polynices face each other in a duel, and kill each other. Their mother Jocasta kills herself on their dead bodies.

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THE FROGS

Dionysius, god of the theatre, goes to the underworld to bring Euripides back to life. His journey ends with the arrival of Euripides and Aeschylus who are having a huge argument about who is the greatest tragic poet. Dionysius is called on to judge, and his decision to prefer the sense of justice and the good of the citizens over personal preferences, means that the palm of victory goes to Aeschylus who will return to save Athens from the disastrous situation in which it languishes. Aeschylus returns to the land of the living, leaving his throne on Pluto’s right hand to Sophocles, on the understanding he will never cede it to Euripides.

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THE FROGS

Dionysius, god of the theatre, goes to the underworld to bring Euripides back to life. His journey ends with the arrival of Euripides and Aeschylus who are having a huge argument about who is the greatest tragic poet. Dionysius is called on to judge, and his decision to prefer the sense of justice and the good of the citizens over personal preferences, means that the palm of victory goes to Aeschylus who will return to save Athens from the disastrous situation in which it languishes. Aeschylus returns to the land of the living, leaving his throne on Pluto’s right hand to Sophocles, on the understanding he will never cede it to Euripides.

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