ALCESTIS

Zeus has condemned Apollo to live as a slave in the household of Admetus, King of Pherae in Thessaly, in order to atone for killing the Cyclops. Because of the warm hospitality the King extends to him, Apollo holds Admetus in great esteem and persuades the Fates to let his friend escape death, on condition that someone sacrifice their life for him. However, neither his friends nor his elderly parents are willing to do it: only his beloved wife Alcestis is prepared to give her life for him. In the meantime Heracles, engaged in one of his twelve labours, comes to the palace and asks for hospitality. Admetus welcomes him generously. Although he cannot hide his tears, he hides their cause from his friend. It is a servant who blurts out to Heracles the true identity of the “unrelated” woman lying dead in the house. The hero decides to go to Hades and bring Alcestis back to life.

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ELECTRA

Orestes, son of Agamemnon, is commanded by Apollo to return to Mycenae and avenge the death of his father, who was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus. As a child Orestes, the heir to the throne, was saved from certain death by his sister Electra, who has been living ever since in the hope of being reunited with her brother and avenging their father’s death. Unbeknownst to all, Orestes comes back to Mycenae and spreads the false news of his own death. Electra falls into despair. Having made sure of his sister’s loyalty, Orestes reveals his identity to her, and together they devise a plan for carrying out their revenge.

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PHAEDRA

Phaedra, daughter of the legendary Cretan King Minos, harbours a tormented passion for her stepson Hippolytus. Encouraged by her nurse, she reveals her love to Hippolytus, who flees the palace in outrage. Phaedra decides to take her revenge on him. Upon her husband Theseus’ return from a journey into the Underworld, she lies and tells him that Hippolytus tried to rape her. Theseus is furious and curses his son, who as a consequence dies a horrible death. When Hippolytus’ body is brought back to the palace, Phaedra confesses her deception to Theseus and kills herself. All that is left to the father is lamenting his fate and recomposing his son’s torn body, as he orders his servants to throw Phaedra’s in a ditch.

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ALCESTIS

Zeus has condemned Apollo to live as a slave in the household of Admetus, King of Pherae in Thessaly, in order to atone for killing the Cyclops. Because of the warm hospitality the King extends to him, Apollo holds Admetus in great esteem and persuades the Fates to let his friend escape death, on condition that someone sacrifice their life for him. However, neither his friends nor his elderly parents are willing to do it: only his beloved wife Alcestis is prepared to give her life for him. In the meantime Heracles, engaged in one of his twelve labours, comes to the palace and asks for hospitality. Admetus welcomes him generously. Although he cannot hide his tears, he hides their cause from his friend. It is a servant who blurts out to Heracles the true identity of the “unrelated” woman lying dead in the house. The hero decides to go to Hades and bring Alcestis back to life.

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ELECTRA

Orestes, son of Agamemnon, is commanded by Apollo to return to Mycenae and avenge the death of his father, who was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus. As a child Orestes, the heir to the throne, was saved from certain death by his sister Electra, who has been living ever since in the hope of being reunited with her brother and avenging their father’s death. Unbeknownst to all, Orestes comes back to Mycenae and spreads the false news of his own death. Electra falls into despair. Having made sure of his sister’s loyalty, Orestes reveals his identity to her, and together they devise a plan for carrying out their revenge.

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PHAEDRA

Phaedra, daughter of the legendary Cretan King Minos, harbours a tormented passion for her stepson Hippolytus. Encouraged by her nurse, she reveals her love to Hippolytus, who flees the palace in outrage. Phaedra decides to take her revenge on him. Upon her husband Theseus’ return from a journey into the Underworld, she lies and tells him that Hippolytus tried to rape her. Theseus is furious and curses his son, who as a consequence dies a horrible death. When Hippolytus’ body is brought back to the palace, Phaedra confesses her deception to Theseus and kills herself. All that is left to the father is lamenting his fate and recomposing his son’s torn body, as he orders his servants to throw Phaedra’s in a ditch.

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