The Suppliants

Danaus and Aegyptus, sons of Belus, king of Egypt are at conflict. The first is the father of fifty daughters and the second of fifty sons who wish to marry the daughters of Danaus. Both Danaus and his daughters refuse such impious matrimony and escape on a ship which takes them to the port of Argos, the homeland of their ancestor Io. The people of Pelagus who occupy Argos agree to help to the fugitives and fend off the herald of Aegyptus who have also reached the coast in an attempt to seize back their cousins.

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Iphigenia in Aulis

nder the command of Agamemnon , the Grecian fleets are due to set sail from the port of Aulis. An old servant describes how the Goddess Artemis, enraged with the Greeks, is blocking the ships by a complete lack of wind. The seer Calchas has announced that in order to placate the fury of the goddess it is necessary to sacrifice Iphigenia, the daughter of Agamemnon. Under the pretext of giving her hand in marriage to Achilles, the King has sent for Iphigenia to meet him at Aulis. A messenger annouces the arrival of the daughter who is accompanied by her mother Clytemnestra. Alas, Agamemnon’s courage fails. He is unable to reveal the terrible truth to the two women, a truth which Clytemnestra finds out by chance through the words of Achilles. The maiden who is intially by deeply perturbed her the fate, has a sudden change of mind and offers up her own life willingly. She faces the sacrifice couragiously, leaving behind her a mother who is wholly consumed by grief.

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Medea

Disowned by her husband Jason, who by the help of her magic and crimes alone was able to steal the Golden fleece, Medea thinks up an atrocious revenge for the hero who has now abandoned her for a new bride Creusa, the daughter of Creon, the king of Corinth. Having exterminated both her rival and the King through the use of her magic, Medea then seals her act of punishment for the traitor Jason by killling the children she had born from him. To the retreating herione’s pain however, whilst she makes her flight on on winged chariot the anihilated father leaves her with the bitter sweet truth that in all the lofty spaces of high heaven there are no gods for a mother who takes the life of her children.

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The Suppliants

Danaus and Aegyptus, sons of Belus, king of Egypt are at conflict. The first is the father of fifty daughters and the second of fifty sons who wish to marry the daughters of Danaus. Both Danaus and his daughters refuse such impious matrimony and escape on a ship which takes them to the port of Argos, the homeland of their ancestor Io. The people of Pelagus who occupy Argos agree to help to the fugitives and fend off the herald of Aegyptus who have also reached the coast in an attempt to seize back their cousins.

find more


 

Iphigenia in Aulis

Under the command of Agamemnon , the Grecian fleets are due to set sail from the port of Aulis. An old servant describes how the Goddess Artemis, enraged with the Greeks, is blocking the ships by a complete lack of wind. The seer Calchas has announced that in order to placate the fury of the goddess it is necessary to sacrifice Iphigenia, the daughter of Agamemnon. Under the pretext of giving her hand in marriage to Achilles, the King has sent for Iphigenia to meet him at Aulis. A messenger annouces the arrival of the daughter who is accompanied by her mother Clytemnestra. Alas, Agamemnon’s courage fails. He is unable to reveal the terrible truth to the two women, a truth which Clytemnestra finds out by chance through the words of Achilles. The maiden who is intially by deeply perturbed her the fate, has a sudden change of mind and offers up her own life willingly. She faces the sacrifice couragiously, leaving behind her a mother who is wholly consumed by grief.

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Medea

Disowned by her husband Jason, who by the help of her magic and crimes alone was able to steal the Golden fleece, Medea thinks up an atrocious revenge for the hero who has now abandoned her for a new bride Creusa, the daughter of Creon, the king of Corinth. Having exterminated both her rival and the King through the use of her magic, Medea then seals her act of punishment for the traitor Jason by killling the children she had born from him. To the retreating herione’s pain however, whilst she makes her flight on on winged chariot the anihilated father leaves her with the bitter sweet truth that in all the lofty spaces of high heaven there are no gods for a mother who takes the life of her children.

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